Tag Archives: precision machining

A busy few months…

During the past Six months we have had some exciting events happening at Amdale, which we would like to share with you.

The whole team have been working extremely hard to prepare the company for the provisional Stage 1 AS9100 assessment which has involved an extensive overhaul of our existing quality procedure.  This audit was carried out on the 24 November 2014 and the feedback from the Assessor was very positive and has recommended us, without reservation to apply for Stage 2 in February 2015.  A positive start!

In keeping with Amdales policy in investing in youth we would like to welcome our new apprentice to the Amdale family.  Jack has joined us from the well respected PETA training scheme which in-conjunction with Amdale has successfully helped ten apprentices gain full qualifications and long term positions in various roles, within the company.  We have high hopes for this young man.

The past two months has seen Amdale produce some interesting new parts for an Anglo/French company, from the oil and gas sector that pushed some of our machining centre capabilities to the limits…and nearly beyond!  The rotor blade machined entirely from Titanium (which is a challenging material to machine at the best of times) has generated a lot of interest from both existing staff members and new visitors to the company.

We have given a fresh new look to our reception area it has a sleek and modern colour scheme, which we think, represents Amdale perfectly.  It also has some existing machined parts on display so if you’re passing feel free to come and check it out.

Lastly and this one we are most excited about!  We have a new arrival coming in the first quarter of 2015…………BUT that’s all you are getting on this for now.  For more updates on this and more follow us on Twitter @AmdaleLimited or check our blog.

How are we tackling the skills gap in Engineering?

Precision engineering forms the backbone of manufacturing activity; it forms an integral part of electrical, electronic and mechanical engineering. From semiconductor chips, to the most advanced medical devices and the most sophisticated drill parts used in oil exploration, precision engineered products play a vital role in the development of the overall economy.

So what will happen in 10 years time when all of the highly skilled engineers we have, retire? The British industry will need 100,000 new graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects every year until 2020 just to maintain current employment numbers.

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Precision Engineering And The Evolution Of The Automotive Sector

The future of the automotive industry is based on quality research and development, optimised with innovative and cutting-edge precision engineering. Precision engineering has played a vital role in the growth of the global automotive industry. Vehicle manufacturers look to the precision engineering sector for innovative, modern and low-weight components in order to develop more advanced and fuel-efficient products.

1913 saw the development of the moving assembly line by Henry Ford, car production increased from one every 12 hours to one every one and a half hours. It was this revolutionary step in production techniques that started the mass production of vehicles and led to the automotive industry fast becoming one of the most important leading global economies.

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EDM Capacity Available Immediately

Amdale has over 25 years experience in EDM Wire Erosion and we have continuously invested in the latest technology in this area. We currently have immediate available capacity in our EDM department.

How does Wire EDM work?

EDM stands for “Electrical Discharge Machine” whereby an electrical charge is applied to an electrode, a brass wire, copper, sterling, or graphite. The electrode then makes an electrical connection with the steel. A spark jumps from the electrode to the work piece and disintegrates the steel with a controlled electrical charge. This process happens thousands of times per second. The mirror image of the electrode is formed in the work piece.

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The ‘Made in Britain’ Revival

For decades the move to overseas manufacturing was seen as inevitable, the attraction of cheaper foreign-made goods proved too strong and caused manufacturers to shift their production abroad in order to become more cost effective. This has had a devastating impact on domestic manufacturing, which declined from about 30% of national GDP in the late 1970s, to 14% before the recession, to just 11% today.

But British manufacturing may be heading for a genuine revival as more UK companies choose to swap their international suppliers for UK-based ones and move more of their operations back to the UK. Recently we have seen a string of high-profile names publicly profess their conversion to manufacturing in Britain. John Lewis recently announced its aim to increase sales of UK products by at least 15% over the next three years to £550m. Even Tesco has now suggested it is keen to source from British farms, and has started investing in British agriculture to boost its competitiveness. Continue reading